What is Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) in Networking?
Networking , Technology & Science / June 14, 2018

Understanding networking is a fundamental part of configuring complex environments on the internet. This has implications when trying to communicate between servers efficiently, developing secure network policies, and keeping your nodes organized. CIDR (Classless Inter-Domain Routing) was introduced in 1993 replacing the previous generation of IP address syntax – classful networks. CIDR allowed for more efficient use of IPv4 address space and prefix aggregation, known as route summarization or supernetting. Basic Overview of CIDR A system called Classless Inter-Domain Routing, or CIDR, was developed as an alternative to traditional subnetting. The idea is that we can add a specification in the IP address itself as to the number of significant bits that make up the routing or networking portion. Classless inter-domain routing (CIDR) is a set of Internet protocol (IP) standards that is used to create unique identifiers for networks and individual devices. The IP addresses allow particular information packets to be sent to specific computers. Shortly after the introduction of CIDR, technicians found it difficult to track and label IP addresses, so a notation system was developed to make the process more efficient and standardized. That system is known as CIDR notation. To illustrate the problems with the class…

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